Medicaid

President Donald Trump speaks in the Diplomatic Room at the White House, in Washington, Thursday, Feb 15, 2018, about the tragic school shooting in Parkland, Fla. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
February 15, 2018 - 6:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is calling for a focus on mental health and school safety in response to shootings like the one that took 17 lives in Florida, but his budget would cut funding in both areas. Trump's latest budget would slash the major source of public funds for mental...
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FILE - In this Sept. 1, 2004, file photo, medical bottles bearing tracking codes in the McKesson medical distribution center in Delran, N.J. President Donald Trump has made big promises to reduce prescription drug costs, but his administration is gravitating to relatively modest steps such as letting Medicare patients share in manufacturer rebates. (AP Photo/Brian Branch-Price, File)
February 12, 2018 - 12:33 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump makes big promises to reduce prescription drug costs, but his administration is gravitating to relatively modest steps such as letting Medicare patients share in manufacturer rebates. Those ideas would represent tangible change and they have a realistic...
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FILE - In this Jan. 19, 2018, file photo. a sign in support of Oregon's Measure 101 is displayed by a homeowner along a roadside in Lake Oswego, Ore. The taxes before voters in the special election on Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018, are a short-term fix for health care funding designed to generate between $210 and $320 million in revenue over two years. Oregon aggressively expanded its Medicaid rolls under the Affordable Care Act and now, just 5 percent of its population is uninsured. But state lawmakers have struggled to come with a long-term funding plan. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
January 24, 2018 - 12:54 am
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Oregon approved taxes on hospitals, health insurers and managed care companies in an unusual special election Tuesday that asked voters — and not lawmakers — how to pay for Medicaid costs that now include coverage of hundreds of thousands of low-income residents added to the...
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In this Friday, Jan. 19, 2018, photo a sign in support of Oregon's Measure 101 is displayed by a homeowner along a roadside in Lake Oswego, Ore. Experts say the special election Tuesday in Oregon is the only instance where voters -- instead of lawmakers -- will decide how to fund the Medicaid expansion among the 32 states and Washington that added enrollees under the Affordable Care Act. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
January 22, 2018 - 1:02 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Oregon aggressively expanded its Medicaid rolls under the Affordable Care Act, adding enough people to leave only 5 percent of its population uninsured — one of America's lowest rates. Now, with the reduction of a federal match that covered those enrollees, the state is...
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Medicaid recipient Thomas J. Penister, of Milwaukee, responds to a question during an interview Friday, Jan. 12, 2018, in Milwaukee. Penister does not favor a work requirement in order to receive Medicaid because of the varying circumstances of the individuals receiving the health insurance. (AP Photo/Gretchen Ehlke)
January 14, 2018 - 5:45 am
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Republicans this past week began to realize their long-held goal of requiring certain adults to work, get job training or perform community service in exchange for getting health coverage through Medicaid. Whether that's a commonsense approach or an added burden that will...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump, right, and Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin, left, talk during a prison reform roundtable in the Roosevelt Room of the Washington. Kentucky has become the first state to win approval from the Trump administration requiring many of its Medicaid recipients to work to receive coverage. The Trump administration gave the go ahead Friday, Jan. 12, 2018. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
January 12, 2018 - 2:24 pm
FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Kentucky became the first state to require many of its Medicaid recipients to work to receive coverage, part of an unprecedented change to the nation's largest health insurance program under the Trump administration. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced the...
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FILE - In this March 22, 2017 file photo, Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Seema Verma listen at right as President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. The Trump administration says it's offering a path for states that want to seek work requirements for Medicaid recipients, and that's a major policy shift toward low-income people. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
January 11, 2018 - 10:15 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Rewriting the rules on health care for the poor, the Trump administration said Thursday it will allow states to require "able-bodied" Medicaid recipients to work, a hotly debated first in the program's half-century history. Seema Verma, head of the Centers for Medicare and...
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FILE - In this Dec. 13, 2017, file photo, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., attends a House and Senate conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Democrats say they’re shifting to offense on health care, emboldened by successes in defending the Affordable Care Act. They say their ultimate goal is a government guarantee of affordable coverage for all. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
January 08, 2018 - 1:29 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats say they're shifting to offense on health care, emboldened by successes in defending the Affordable Care Act. They say a government guarantee of affordable coverage for all is their ultimate goal. With Republicans unable to agree on a vision for health care, Democrats...
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December 28, 2017 - 5:57 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 8.7 million people signed up for coverage next year under the Obama-era health care law, the government reported Thursday, as the program that President Donald Trump has repeatedly pronounced "a disaster" exceeded expectations. The final tally for the 39 HealthCare.gov...
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December 23, 2017 - 11:05 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Kmart Corp. has agreed to pay $32.3 million to settle allegations its pharmacies caused federal health programs to overpay for prescription drugs by not telling the government about discounted prices. The U.S. Department of Justice announced the settlement agreement Friday. Kmart...
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