This April 2018 photo provided by the American Civil Liberties Union shows Katia Hills and her son. Plaintiffs Cynthia Allen and Hills filed a federal court lawsuit Monday, May 14, 2018, accusing AT&T's mobile phone subsidiary of firing them for pregnancy-related absences in violation of federal anti-discrimination laws. (Susan Hills/American Civil Liberties Union via AP)

Lawsuit accuses AT&T Mobility of pregnancy discrimination

May 14, 2018 - 2:35 pm

NEW YORK (AP) — Two women have filed a federal court lawsuit accusing AT&T's mobile phone subsidiary of firing them for pregnancy-related absences in violation of federal anti-discrimination laws.

The women allege that AT&T Mobility's attendance policy, which assigns point-based demerits for late arrivals, early departures and absences, discriminates against pregnant women. According to the class-action lawsuit, both women were fired after accruing points for missing work because of pregnancy-related medical care, and, in one plaintiff's case, her infant son's emergency medical needs.

The plaintiffs, Katia Hills and Cynthia Allen, filed their claim on behalf of all female non-managerial employees in AT&T Mobility's retail stores nationwide, and seek redress for all of these employees whose rights have allegedly been violated.

AT&T said it does not tolerate discrimination of any kind, including for pregnancy.

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