Technology

Homeland security adviser Tom Bossert takes the podium from White House press secretary Sean Spicer, to speak about the mass destruction offensive malware, Monday, May 15, 2017, during the daily press briefing at the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
May 15, 2017 - 2:28 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's homeland security adviser says that so far, no U.S. federal systems have been affected by the global cyberattack. Tom Bossert says the U.S. government has been closely monitoring the attack, which has affected an estimated 300,000 machines in 150 countries...
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FILE - In this May 13, 2017, file photo, a screenshot of the warning screen from a purported ransomware attack, as captured by a computer user in Taiwan, is seen on a laptop in Beijing. As danger from the global cyberattack continues to fade, analysts are starting to assess the damage. The good news: Hard-hit organizations such as the U.K.’s National Health Service appear to be bouncing back, and few people seem to have actually paid the ransom. The bad: This attack has demonstrated how a new automated form of malware can spread rapidly, potentially encouraging future hackers. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
May 15, 2017 - 11:13 am
LONDON (AP) — The "ransomware" cyberattack that has crippled companies and governments around the world ebbed in intensity on Monday, though experts warned that new versions of the virus could emerge. Thousands more infections were reported Monday, largely in Asia, which had been closed for...
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A patient takes a nap on her wheelchair as she waits with others at the registration desk at Dharmais Cancer Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia, Monday, May 15, 2017. Global cyber chaos was spreading Monday as companies booted up computers at work following the weekend's worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack. The extortion scheme created chaos in 150 countries and could wreak even greater havoc as more malicious variations appear. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
May 15, 2017 - 7:10 am
TOKYO (AP) — The worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack spread to thousands of more computers on Monday as people logged in at work, disrupting business, schools, hospitals and daily life, though no new large-scale breakdowns were reported. In Britain, whose health service was among the first high-...
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A patient takes a nap on her wheelchair as she waits with others at the registration desk at Dharmais Cancer Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia, Monday, May 15, 2017. Global cyber chaos was spreading Monday as companies booted up computers at work following the weekend's worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack. The extortion scheme created chaos in 150 countries and could wreak even greater havoc as more malicious variations appear. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
May 15, 2017 - 6:35 am
TOKYO (AP) — The worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack spread to thousands of more computers on Monday as people logged in at work, disrupting business, schools, hospitals and daily life, though no new large-scale breakdowns were reported. In Britain, whose health service was among the first high-...
Read More
FILE - In this May 13, 2017, file photo, a screenshot of the warning screen from a purported ransomware attack, as captured by a computer user in Taiwan, is seen on a laptop in Beijing. As danger from the global cyberattack continues to fade, analysts are starting to assess the damage. The good news: Hard-hit organizations such as the U.K.’s National Health Service appear to be bouncing back, and few people seem to have actually paid the ransom. The bad: This attack has demonstrated how a new automated form of malware can spread rapidly, potentially encouraging future hackers. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
May 15, 2017 - 5:58 am
LONDON (AP) — The latest on the global extortion cyberattack that hit dozens of countries (all times local): 10:55 a.m. Indian authorities were on high alert for news of malfunctioning computers Monday, after experts estimated 5 percent of affected computers were in the country. The Computer...
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A patient takes a nap on her wheelchair as she waits with others at the registration desk at Dharmais Cancer Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia, Monday, May 15, 2017. Global cyber chaos was spreading Monday as companies booted up computers at work following the weekend's worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack. The extortion scheme created chaos in 150 countries and could wreak even greater havoc as more malicious variations appear. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
May 15, 2017 - 5:01 am
TOKYO (AP) — The worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack wreaked havoc in hospitals, schools and offices across the globe on Monday. Asia reported thousands of new cases but no large-scale breakdowns as workers started the week by booting up their computers. The full extent of the damage from the...
Read More
FILE - In this May 13, 2017, file photo, a screenshot of the warning screen from a purported ransomware attack, as captured by a computer user in Taiwan, is seen on a laptop in Beijing. As danger from the global cyberattack continues to fade, analysts are starting to assess the damage. The good news: Hard-hit organizations such as the U.K.’s National Health Service appear to be bouncing back, and few people seem to have actually paid the ransom. The bad: This attack has demonstrated how a new automated form of malware can spread rapidly, potentially encouraging future hackers. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
May 15, 2017 - 4:59 am
TOKYO (AP) — The latest on the global extortion cyberattack that hit dozens of countries (all times local): 5:50 p.m. In France, auto manufacturer Renault said one of its plants, which employs 3,500 people in Douai, northern France, wasn't reopening Monday as technicians continued to deal with the...
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A patient takes a nap on her wheelchair as she waits with others at the registration desk at Dharmais Cancer Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia, Monday, May 15, 2017. Global cyber chaos was spreading Monday as companies booted up computers at work following the weekend's worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack. The extortion scheme created chaos in 150 countries and could wreak even greater havoc as more malicious variations appear. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
May 15, 2017 - 4:50 am
TOKYO (AP) — The worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack wreaked havoc in hospitals, schools and offices across the globe on Monday. Asia reported thousands of new cases but no large-scale breakdowns as workers started the week by booting up their computers. The full extent of the damage from the...
Read More
FILE - In this May 13, 2017, file photo, a screenshot of the warning screen from a purported ransomware attack, as captured by a computer user in Taiwan, is seen on a laptop in Beijing. As danger from the global cyberattack continues to fade, analysts are starting to assess the damage. The good news: Hard-hit organizations such as the U.K.’s National Health Service appear to be bouncing back, and few people seem to have actually paid the ransom. The bad: This attack has demonstrated how a new automated form of malware can spread rapidly, potentially encouraging future hackers. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
May 15, 2017 - 4:14 am
TOKYO (AP) — The latest on the global extortion cyberattack that hit dozens of countries (all times local): 4:46 p.m. The problem with its home page wasn't ransomware after all, Osaka city hall said. The site is now back up but the real cause of the problem is not yet clear, said spokesman Hajime...
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FILE - In this May 11, 2017 file photo, the emblem of a Nissan car is seen at its showroom in Tokyo. Japan has fallen victim of a global "ransomware" cyberattack that has created chaos in 150 countries. Nissan Motor Co. confirmed Monday, May 15, 2017, some units had been targeted, but there was no major impact on its business. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)
May 15, 2017 - 1:46 am
TOKYO (AP) — The latest on the global extortion cyberattack that hit dozens of countries (all times local): 5:15 a.m. A Japanese nonprofit says has computers at 600 locations had been hit in the global "ransomware" cyberattack. Nissan Motor Co. confirmed Monday some units had been targeted, but...
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