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Most Wanted Man in America- Eric Matthew Frein


Police are looking for 31 year old Eric Matthew Frein of Canadensis.  He is wanted for the ambush killing of Cpl. Bryon K Dickson II and for injuring Trooper Alex T. Douglass.  Police say he is at large and considered armed and dangerous.  He is 6'1", 165 pounds with blue eyes.

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Posts from May 2013


It's All About Liz
Tuesday, May 28, 2013

First Liz Randol lost her loaded gun.
Then she lost the election.
Now it looks like she could lose whatever sense of political principle her supporters always thought she had.
The Democratic candidate in the Scranton mayoral election seems a little too greedy for political power in ways that surprise some supporters who always thought it was about public service and not about Liz.
Surprise.
It’s all about Liz.
And she seems willing to do whatever it takes politically to get elected mayor.
The worst example of her ego occurred election night after she conceded loss to opponent Bill Courtright, a Democrat with his own ego problems. Liz even lost her own South Side neighborhood.
But Liz gave no concession speech.
Instead she whipped her supporters into an embarrassing frenzy that raised the hopes of people who deserved better. She promised, not hoped for, but promised that she would win the Republican nomination thanks to a sneaky write-in campaign that relatively few people knew about.
Had more people known, she actually might have won.
But bad planning, despite her Ph.D. in Philosophy and Buddhist Studies, took her out of the mix.
No matter what Liz says or how her beautiful people supporters try to spin it, bad planning troubled her campaign from beginning to end. One campaign worker told me she was never organized enough to send the army of get-out-the-vote workers to campaign in the days leading up to Election Day. A smart political consultant who worked another race told me that Liz treated the polls as it she owned them and had already won.
But Liz lost.
Liz beat herself.
I will always believe that the gun incident – that is not over from what I’m hearing – took her out of contention.
Had Liz not lost her gun that turned up loaded on a city sidewalk a block away from an elementary school, more people would have embraced her campaign and contributed money and name power to her bid for office. Liz could have won and would have made the best mayor – for whatever that’s worth.
But she also lost the support of too many regular, responsible voters and too many women over 50 who thought Liz was too glitzy and looked like her jewelery cost more than they and their husbands made in a week.
Smart women candidates downplay the glimmer.
Liz was a novice who lost her only previous electoral bid who refused tell her own people the truth when she misled them on Election night.
“Game on,” she howled at her after election party. “Game on.”
And her fans cheered.
But she had lost the write-in, too.
Now word on the street is that Gary Lewis, who won the Republican nod, might pull out of the general election. That rumor was on the street before the election but now it’s hot. Republican bosses are saying they could then appoint a candidate.
Would Liz really accept the hated Republican endorsement.
Is the Pope a Catholic?
This perceived liberal feminist abortion rights supporter might be the weirdest Republican since Jimmy Connors. But since it’s all about Liz I will not put it past her. Will she make deals and promise a big piece of her world to Republican devils? Next time you see Liz, ask her.
This scenario, if true, should erupt in the next few days. Secret meetings and sleazy operatives meeting in back rooms will once again be in vogue. And Liz loves vogue. But is Scranton ready for beautiful people Republicans?
Maybe Liz can will say a novena at St. Ann’s and raffle off an assault rifle to show how serious she is about her new non-partisam political science.
Because, in Scranto, every day is Election Day and all the votes are for sale.
When it comes to politics, it’s never over.

 
Tags :  
Topics: Politics
Social:
People: Bill CourtrightGary LewisJimmy ConnorsLiz Randol


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Taking Our Victories Where We Find Them
Thursday, May 23, 2013
On primary Election Day I talked on the radio for seven hours, excitedly commenting about regional politics and the severe impact that candidates who win will have on the quality of our lives. As the May 21 election drew near, I spent days talking about nothing but local politics. Not once during my daily four hour show did I run out of information to share, news to break or reasons to fight the power.
But voter turnout Tuesday was dismal.
People didn’t care.
They really didn’t care.
I believe people do care about their lives and the quality of their communities. It’s just that people have lost faith in political candidates who seem mostly to be about political business as usual. And, in Northeastern Pennsylvania, the business as usual politics we know so well has helped maim the public trust.
Public trust survives with the weakest civic heartbeat.
Yet, if we refuse to give in to the powerbrokers who have grown so used to getting their way, we can one day swing through the political jungle like Tarzan out to rescue the losers and the lost. As long as we bend to the power rather than rising to fight the powers that be, we remain the losers and the lost.
They win. They control. They benefit.  They laugh all the way to their next elected office.
I understand the frustration. In hard coal country, giving up is sometimes even viewed as victory rather than defeat. Some people believe they win when they refuse to dignify the sewer of politics by participating in any way.
I urge you to join me in jumping into the muck.
Politics never fixes itself.
Left to its’ own hysterical devices, the sewer gets worse and the rats that cavort among the flotsam carry a perpetual disease that spreads germs of toxic cultural destruction. That sounds gross because the process of fighting back is gross.
I fight the rats because I will not be ruled by rats.
So now I’m offering you a job with the biggest pest extermination company in the land – a powerful start-up company run by the people for the people.
We must volunteer to step willingly into the muck together, battling until the end. Even if we never prevail in our lifetimes, we must take our victories wherever and whenever we find them,
On Tuesday, believe it or not, we found a few.
Kathy Dobash, of Hazleton, won a Republican nomination to run in November’s election for a seat on the Luzerne County Council. Dobash lost in her previous bid yet never wavered in her commitment to do whatever she can to hold public officials to the same standard of accountability that she holds herself.
Dobash has little money and little power in her life. Yet she campaigned by bringing honor to a field of dishonor and emerged victorious. I wish her well in her continuing mission to fight political corruption, government waste and political abuse. People such as Dobash can help lessen the impact of nepotism, cronyism and patronage – breeding grounds for the culture of corruption.
Up north in my Scranton hometown, 23-year-old Robert Casey emerged as the high vote getter in the Democratic primary race for Scranton School Board. The political newcomer is finishing up a college degree and works in customer service at the Gerrity’s Supermarket on Meadow Avenue.
Casey, who’s no relation to the local Casey political dynasty, helped dump longtime school director and political leech Bob Lesh.
Guided by his dad of the same name, a former Scranton school director himself, the kid came out of nowhere. I admit that I didn’t vote for Casey because I didn’t know anything about him. But the young man has already taught me a lesson.
A few days before the election, while standing in the check-out line, I spotted young Casey on duty in Gerrity’s. Walking at a brisk pace with that smiling Irish mug on him, he suddenly stopped in mid-step, stooped and scooped up a piece of paper that some slob had dropped on the floor. In one smooth, continuing motion the kid flipped the trash into the garbage can. The grin never left his face.
Other workers would have either not noticed or avoided the job.
But Casey was paying attention.
Casey’s clean sweep stands as an innocently simple, yet stunning, example of the best that must be yet to come.
Dobash and Casey have inspired me to keep punching. You, too, should be ready for the sound of the bell and the opportunity to step into the center of the ring.
Nobody can beat you as long as you’re willing to fight one more round.

 


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Doing The Armed And Dangerous Shuffle
Thursday, May 16, 2013

We’re really just a few days out of Primary Election 2013 – an election that shapes the things to come.

You might not realize just how important this election is. I do, and want you to understand the importance as well. The quality of life in Lackawanna and Luzerne counties depends on the outcome.

With good reason, most of us still do not trust public officials – particularly county judges.

That’s why the judicial race in Lackawanna County is crucial.

So far, Patti Grande Rieder and Jim Gibbons have distinguished themselves – not as good candidates, but as people who do not rise to the level of judgment we need o the bench.

Rieder babbled her way through a recent on-air interview with me, refusing to tell us what happened when she got fired and then re-hired as a county judicial clerk. She also defended and downplayed the role of a suspended lawyer who works on her election campaign. She al;so seems to have flat-out lied about an audible "whisperer" who tried to provide answers to my questions.

Gibbons left me a voice message in which he defended a well-known lawyer member of his finance committee who acted as moderator for the only debate of the season – a clear conflict of interest and an obvious appearance of impropriety – which seems to be a clear violation of the state judicial code of conduct. Frankly, because Gibbons is a magistrate, I believe an ethics violation might very well have already occurred – before he even becomes a county judge – something voters must make sure does not happen.

Another big race is the Scranton mayoral contest.

No matter how many candidates aspire to the job, only two have a chance – Democrats Bill Courtright and Liz Randol.

Neither will get my vote.

Courtright has botched his job as the Scranton tax collector and Randol lost a loaded handgun that turned up on a city sidewalk a block away from an elementary school. Intelligence must be measured by more than academic degrees. If anything, Randol’s Ph.D. should have taught her discipline and responsibility, two traits lost in her armed and dangerous shuffle.

Scranton needs common sense whether or not you have a doctorate.

Another dandy race in Scranton is “Little Billy” Gaughan’s run for city council.

Gaughan is the ticking time bomb candidate who I believe accosted me and my WILK News Radio colleagues two St. Patrick’s Days parades ago with a barrage of foul language and homophobic slurs. He was clearly under the influence of recklessness and made a complete fool of himself as we watched in awe. In a bizarre on-air interview with me, Gaughan said he could not remember the encounter. He did not deny the episode that at least a dozen eyewitnesses observed. He just said he could not remember.

Gaughan went on to use his mental prowess and local Minooka section of Scranton political connections to obtain a job as a teacher in the Scranton School District – which makes all sitting school directors who approved his hiring – including Bob Lesh and Bob Sheridan, who are running for re-election – incompetent to serve the public and not fit for public office.

Gaughan seems to have more signs on the street than numbers in his IQ yet seems to be a favorite to win. Scranton is in for trouble if this young lout takes a city council seat. He’ll be great for the news business and terrible for the city.

But Scranton is used to misery.

And, of course, misery loves “Little Billy” Gaughan & Co.

Down south in Luzerne County, sitting county Controller Walter Griffith is in trouble since the district attorney accused him of illegally recording telephone and other conversations. Griffith has not been arrested but the attorney general’s office is investigating. As a result, Walter refuses to talk with the press or even give a deposition in a lawsuit filed against him and the county.

As weird as Luzerne County politics has been, and it ranks right up there with the worst that can happen,. Griffith is to my knowledge the first candidate running for re-election who refuses to answer questions from the press.

Beautiful.

I no longer trust Walter Griffith.

I used to trust him but no more.

I used to trust Liz Randol.

But no more.

Politics is getting scarier and nastier in Northeastern Pennsylvania.

In too many ways, we’re on our own.

So let’s shake hands and come out voting.

Life might get better.

Or not.


 


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Doing The Armed And Dangerous Shuffle
Thursday, May 16, 2013

We’re really just a few days out of Primary Election 2013 – an election that shapes the things to come.

You might not realize just how important this election is. I do, and want you to understand the importance as well. The quality of life in Lackawanna and Luzerne counties depends on the outcome.

With good reason, most of us still do not trust public officials – particularly county judges.

That’s why the judicial race in Lackawanna County is crucial.

So far, Patti Grande Rieder and Jim Gibbons have distinguished themselves – not as good candidates, but as people who do not rise to the level of judgment we need on the bench.

Rieder babbled her way through a recent on-air interview with me, refusing to tell voters what happened when she got fired and then re-hired as a county judicial clerk. She also defended and downplayed the role of a suspended lawyer who works on her election campaign. She also seemed to flat-out lie about an audible  "whisperer" telling her the answers to my questions.

Gibbons left me a telephone message defending a well-known lawyer and member of his finance committee acting as moderator for the only debate of the season – a clear conflict of interest and obvious appearance of impropriety – which is a precise violation of the state judicial code of conduct. Frankly, because Gibbons is a magistrate, I believe an ethics violation might very well have already occurred – before he even becomes a county judge – something voters must make sure does not happen.

Another big race is the Scranton mayoral contest.

No matter how many candidates aspire to the job, only two have a change – Democrats Bill Courtright and Liz Randol.

Neither will get my vote.

Courtright has botched his job as the Scranton tax collector and Randol lost a loaded handgun that turned up on a city sidewalk a block away from an elementary school. Intelligence must be measured by more than academic degrees. If anything, Randol’s Ph.D. should have taught her discipline and responsibility, two traits lost in her armed and dangerous shuffle.

Scranton needs common sense whether or not you have a doctorate.

Another dandy race in Scranton is “Little Billy” Gaughan’s run for city council.

Gaughan is the ticking time bomb candidate who I believe accosted me and my WILK News Radio colleagues two St. Patrick’s Days parades ago with a barrage of foul language and homophobic slurs. He was clearly under the influence of recklessness and made a complete fool of himself as we watched in awe. In a bizarre on-air interview with me, Gaughan said he could not remember the encounter. He did not deny the episode that at least a dozen eyewitnesses observed. He just said he could not remember.

Gaughan went on to use his mental prowess and local Minooka section of Scranton political connections to obtain a job as a teacher in the Scranton School District – which makes all sitting school directors who approved his hiring – including Bob Lesh and Bob Sheridan, who are running for re-election – incompetent to serve the public and not fit for public office.

Gaughan seems to have more signs on the street than numbers in his IQ yet seems to be a favorite to win. Scranton is in for trouble if this young lout takes a city council seat. He’ll be great for the news business and terrible for the city.

But Scranton is used to misery.

And, of course, misery loves “Little Billy” Gaughan & Co.

Down south in Luzerne County, sitting county Controller Walter Griffith is in trouble since the district attorney accused him of illegally recording telephone and other conversations. Griffith has not been arrested but the attorney general’s office is investigating. As a result, Walter refuses to talk with the press or even give a deposition in a lawsuit filed against him and the county.

As weird as Luzerne County politics has been, and it ranks right up there with the worst that can happen,. Griffith is to my knowledge the first candidate running for re-election who refuses to answer questions from the press.

Beautiful.

I no longer trust Walter Griffith.

I used to trust him but no more.

I used to trust Liz Randol.

But no more.

Politics is getting scarier and nastier in Northeastern Pennsylvania.

In too many ways, we’re on our own.

So let’s shake hands and come out voting.

Life could get better.

Or not.


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